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AF 447 Flight Deck and Cabin Crew and Passenger Information

Published June 5, 2009 by starvillanueva

Flight Deck

The Captain was 58, French. He/She entered Air France in 1988 and was qualified on the Airbus A330/A340 in February 2007. The Captain had 11,000 flying hours, which included 1,700 hours on the Airbus A330/340.

The 2 co-pilots were French. They were 37 and 32 years old. They started working for Air France in 1999 and 2004. They were qualified on the Airbus A330/340 in April 2002 and June 2008. The first co-pilot had 6,600 flying hours which included 2,600 hours on the Airbus A330/340. The second co-pilot had a total of 3,000 flying hours which included 800 hours on the Airbus A330/340.

Cabin Crew

The Chief Flight Attendant was French, 49, and entered Air France in 1985. The two other pursers were French, 54 and 46 years old and entered Air France in 1981 and 1989.

There were 6 stewards and stewardesses on board. 5 of them where French and 1 was Brazilian. They were between the ages of 24 and 44 years old and they started working for Air France between 1996 and 2007.

Air France identified the nationalities of the victims of flight 447:

61 French
58 Brazilians
26 Germans
9 Chinese
9 Italians
6 Swiss
5 British
5 Lebanese
4 Hungarians
3 Slovakian
3 Irish
3 Norwegians
2 Americans
2 Moroccans
2 Polish
2 Spanish
1 Argentinean
1 Austrian
1 Belgian
1 Canadian
1 Croatian
1 Dane
1 Dutch
1 Estonian
1 Filipino
1 Gambian
1 Icelandic
1 Romanian
1 Russian
1 Swedish
1 Turkish

Source:
 

4 Passenger Missed Air France 447 Flight

Published June 5, 2009 by starvillanueva

"No one lives forever. We often forget that."
 

The survivors say their relief is overshadowed by the immense sense of loss they feel for those who didn’t make it.

"It feels miraculous and sad at the same time," said Amina Benouargha-Jaffiol, who tried to get on the flight Sunday night, even enlisting a diplomat friend to try to pressure Air France to let her and her husband on.

"Of course, at some level we feel lucky, but we also feel an enormous sadness for all those who perished," she said.

For some it was a simple matter of arriving at Rio’s airport late; for Andrej Aplinc, it was because he got there early.

The 39-year-old Slovenian sailor and father of two was spared because his cab driver was in a hurry to see a soccer match.

With time to spare at the airport, Aplinc, who was supposed to take Flight 447, learned there was no seat on the plane with enough legroom for him to stretch out his bum knee. But since he’d arrived early, he was able to board an earlier 4 p.m. Air France flight, which did have a roomy seat.

"It was such huge luck that I flew with that earlier plane," Aplinc said from his home in Radelj Ob Dravi in northeastern Slovenia.

Gustavo Ciriaco was scheduled to be on that 4 p.m. flight. But he arrived late at the check-in and was told airline agents could not find his seat and the gate was about to close.

The 39-year-old Brazilian choreographer and dancer was on his way to Europe for two weeks of rehearsals for his next ballet, and had a connecting flight to catch in Paris.

Ciriaco pleaded to be let him on the plane, and finally the airline discovered the seating error and relented.

If the reservation mix-up hadn’t been resolved, "I would have tried to take the following flight because I would have arrived in Paris with enough time to catch my connection," Ciriaco said.

The next flight? Air France 447.

"Survivors" like these often need psychological counseling, said Guillaume Denoix de Saint-Marc, whose father was among the 170 people killed in 1989 when Libyan terrorists downed UTA Flight 772 with a suitcase bomb. He now heads an association that helps victims of airline disasters.

"They can have big psychological problems. We meet a lot of people like that," said Denoix de Saint-Marc, who was asked by French authorities to counsel relatives of the victims of Flight 447 at a crisis center at Paris’ airport.

In the case of UTA flight 772, some of the pilots and cabin crew who had flown the French DC-10 jetliner before handing it over to the doomed crew "couldn’t resume their careers," Denoix de Saint-Marc said.

"They lost their flying licenses because of big psychological problems or alcoholism," he said.

Such traumas have a name: "Survivors’ syndrome," seen often in combat and other crisis situations in which those who make it feel as though they fled, deserted their buddies or were cowardly, said psychiatrist Ronan Orio.

But being saved by the ticket counter, traffic or other caprices of life should not be considered traumatic, said Orio, who has worked with victims of hostage situations, terror attacks and airline crashes.

Instead, near-miss situations should be viewed in a positive light, he said.

"People who take a plane and have a second chance win the lotto. They have the right to continue where the others died," he said.

Benouargha-Jaffiol and her husband Claude Jaffiol got a second chance last Sunday.

The couple, who live in Montpellier, France, had pulled strings to try to get on Flight 447, even drafting a family friend, a Dutch diplomat, to phone Air France and try to get them seats on the overcrowded plane.

"My husband demanded that Air France put us on that flight," Benouargha-Jaffiol said. "But nothing doing, the flight was totally full."

She and her husband finally left the airport, returning Monday after the disaster.


PARIS (AP) — A reservation mix-up, an overbooking and a Brazilian cabbie’s passion for soccer are all that saved some would-be passengers on Air France flight 447 from the fate of 228 others who lost their lives in the mid-Atlantic.

Source: http://www.airfrance447.com/

Air France AF-447 crash mystery

Published June 2, 2009 by starvillanueva

 * This news really gets my attention for 2 reasons: because on my last Manila flight our Boeing 777 has been hit by a lightning fortunately nothing bad happened besides from delays and next week I will have Paris flight hopefully it will be a safe journey…

The presumed crash of Air France flight AF447with 216 passengers and a crew of 12, continues to pose a mystery to aviation writers and analysts world-wide.

Stunned analysts say it would take extremely violent weather to bring down such a large jet, especially one as reliable and modern as the Airbus A330-200 in question.

By industry standards Air France has a relatively young fleet and the aircraft operating flight AF447, registration number F-GZCP, had only entered service in April 2005 and had passed a routine in-hanger inspection in mid-April.

Former Airbus pilot John Wiley told CNN that speculation lightning had brought down the plane was likely to prove unfounded since most modern passenger aircraft were capable of withstanding direct strikes.

Analyst Kieran Daly of online aviation news service Air Transport Intelligence said the lack of communication with the aircraft “does suggest it was something serious and catastrophic.

“The A330 is state-of-the-art, with extremely reliable engines made by General Electric.”

CNN air travel expert Richard Quest says the twin-engine plane, a stalwart of long-haul routes, has an impeccable safety record, with only one fatal incident involving a training flight in 1994.

“It has very good range, and is extremely popular with airlines because of its versatility,” he said.

Brazil and France have scrambled search and rescue aircraft on both sides of the Atlantic, but with a vast area to scour, there is dwindling hope of finding survivors.

The Brazilian Air Force said the flight AF447 was last logged flying at an altitude of 10,600 meters (35,000 feet) before contact was lost.

Qatar Airways Takes Proactive Precautionary Measures over

Published April 27, 2009 by starvillanueva

Doha, QATAR – Qatar Airways has initiated a number of measures over heightened global health concerns amid the recent outbreak of influenza A (H1N1) swine flu virus in Mexico.

Qatar Airways Chief Executive Officer Akbar Al Baker said: “The health and wellbeing of all our passengers and employees is of paramount importance and Qatar Airways in no way compromises the safety of any individual.

“Passengers should be reassured that modern aircraft have very advanced air filtration systems which ensure a high level of air quality despite the confined environment they are travelling in.”

Qatar Airways has been working closely with local health authorities in Qatar and monitoring developments with international health organisations and governments around the world in order to be able to take the most appropriate measures.

Since April 27th, Qatar Airways has required that all operating flight deck and cabin crew wear masks on flights originating from the United States – namely daily services from New York, Washington DC and Houston.Passengers on Qatar Airways’ flights originating from the US to Doha are being issued with masks upon boarding and advised to wear them inflight. In addition, all Qatar Airways’ customer contact staff in the United States and at Doha International Airport are required to wear masks.If prior to boarding in the US or during transit in Doha, passengers are identified as having flu or fever-like symptoms, they will be referred to a local medical centre to determine their suitability to travel.The airline’s decision has been taken to control the potential transmission of the virus to fellow passengers and crew onboard.


Source: Qatar Airways Website

Narita accident Strands 1,600 pax in Manila

Published March 24, 2009 by starvillanueva

                                  

Four Boeing 747-400 flights going out of Ninoy Aquino International Airport was cancelled after a FedEx MD-11 cargo aircraft crash at 6:49 am (7:49 Manila time) yesterday in Tokyo’s Narita Airport and consequently causing the closure of one of its runway and resulting to cancellation of 38 outgoing flights.

The FedEx cargo plane smashed into the runway and burst into a ball of fire while attempting to land killing the pilot Kevin Kyle Mosley, 54, and copilot Anthony Stephen Pino, 49. Aviation Accident Investigators believed that wind shear, an aviation term for sudden gust of strong wind, may have been a factor in the accident.

The airlines that were unable to leave Manila was Japan Airlines flight JL746 scheduled to depart at 9:10, while JL741 which is supposed to arrive in the afternoon failed to depart from the same airport for a return trip. Northwest flight NW002 which was scheduled to leave for Detroit via Narita at 8 am with about 400 passengers, was also cancelled.

Meanwhile, a Boeing 747 Philippine Airlines flight PR431 from Tokyo failed to arrive at 1:30 pm. Its return flight to Narita, PR432, marooned another 400 passengers at the Centennial Terminal 2.

The accident however strands thousands of passengers, half of it bound for the United States, which was left unattended at Terminals 1 and 2. Its been a practice of airlines that in the case of unforeseen event, such as the FedEx plane crash, that the carrier is not responsible for hotel accommodations of stranded passengers or to take care of their food billings, except when the reason for suspension of flight was when the airplane they were supposed to take experience technical problems.

* Source
 

Incident: Qatar Airways Boeing 777 Engine Failure

Published October 3, 2008 by starvillanueva


The crew of a Qatar Airways Boeing 777-300, registration A7-BAA performing flight QR52 from Washington,DC (USA) to Doha (Qatar) last Sept 06 2008, declared emergency due to an engine failure about 175nm west of Gander while enroute at FL370 and requested a descent to FL200. After the descent to FL200 the flight deck crew dumped fuel and diverted to Gander,NL (Canada). The airplane landed safely at Gander about 50 minutes after the engine failure.

The crew had attempted a relight of the engine, during which the EGT limits were exceeded. Subsequent inspection after landing revealed tiny particles in the tailpipe and debris on chip detectors. The engine (GE90-115B) was removed and sent to the manufacturer for further analysis.

A replacement aircraft, an Airbus A330-200, registration A7-ACA was dispatched to Gander as flight QR3052 to pick the passengers up and bring them to London Heathrow.